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Ace No. 2 on Valley’s No. 2

COLUMBIANA — Jim Berryman registered the second hole-in-one of his life Wednesday when he aced the 140-yard second hole at the Valley Golf Club. He used a 7-iron.

Berryman, of Columbiana, was playing in the Beaver Golf League. His playing partners were Matt Polen of Columbiana, Herb Finley of New Waterford and Brian Dicken of Lisbon.

Marathon memorial takes shape

BOSTON (AP) — Four bronze spires that will make up part of a memorial to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings have been put in place near the finish line.

The spires, ranging in height from about 17 feet (5 meters) to 21 feet (6 meters), will serve as light poles for the memorial. They were installed Wednesday at one of the two locations where pressure cooker bombs detonated on April 15, 2013, killing three people and wounding more than 260 others.

Memorials will eventually stand at both sites and will also honor two police officers who died after the attacks.

Planning began four years ago for the $2 million memorial, and it’s since undergone substantial redesign.

Artist Pablo Eduardo has said it’s important to meet the hopes and expectations of families who lost loved ones.

“Robot umpires” debut

YORK, Pa. (AP) — “Robot umpires” have arrived.

The independent Atlantic League became the first American professional baseball league to let a computer call balls and strikes Wednesday night at its All-Star Game. Plate umpire Brian deBrauwere wore an earpiece connected to an iPhone in his pocket and relayed the call upon receiving it from a TrackMan computer system that uses Doppler radar.

He crouched in his normal position behind the catcher and signaled balls and strikes.

“Until we can trust this system 100 percent, I still have to go back there with the intention of getting a pitch correct because if the system fails, it doesn’t pick a pitch up or if it registers a pitch that’s a foot-and-a-half off the plate as a strike, I have to be prepared to correct that,” deBrauwere said before the game.

It didn’t appear deBrauwere had any delay receiving the calls at first but players noticed a big difference.

“One time I already had caught the ball back from the catcher and he signaled strike,” said pitcher Daryl Thompson, who didn’t realize the technology was being used until after he disagreed with a call.

Infielder L.J. Mazzilli said a few times hitters who struck out lingered an extra second or so in the batter’s box waiting on a called third strike.

“The future is crazy but it’s cool to see the direction of baseball,” Mazzilli said.

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